THURSDAY SCHEDULE

Thursday, June 8, 2017

  • 6:30am – 9:00am — Registration in the lobby of the Student Memorial Center (SMC) at Millersville University.
  • 6:30am – 8:00am — Breakfast (included with conference registration) in Gordonier Hall.
  • 7:00am – 8:00am — Plant Sale and Trade Show OPEN in Marauder Court, lower level of SMC.
  • 8:00am – 8:15am — Welcome
  • 8:15am-9:15am — Full Audience: Assisted Diversification for the Anthropocene by Chuck Cannon. Currently, human activity is changing the fundamental global nature of the climate, the environment, and natural ecosystems like forests and prairies, which may make ‘restoration’ of past conditions impossible. Plants, particularly trees, have adapted well to previous major global shifts and we must allow them to exploit the natural processes, like hybridization and migration and evolution, which have enabled them to adapt in the past. Botanic gardens are ideal organizations to lead the exploration and management of an ‘assisted diversification’ program. Attendees will:  be introduced to the importance of Anthropocene, observe the importance of hybridization, and learn ways to move forward.
  • 9:15am-10:15am — Full Audience:  Pawpaw – The Story of America’s Forgotten Fruit by Andy Moore. What is a pawpaw, and why have most people never heard of it before? Andrew Moore offers a brief history of the pawpaw, the largest edible fruit native to the United States, and offers some explanations as to why it has been overlooked in modern times. He also provides an overview of the growers and producers working to raise the fruit’s profile, and how the fruit tree can be reintegrated into our diets and culture. Attendees will:  have a basic understanding of pawpaw, be inspired to seek out pawpaw fruit and trees, and have an understanding of pawpaw uses, potential, and basic growing guidelines.
  • 10:15am-10:35am — Break
  • 10:35am-11:35am — Concurrent Sessions A (4 options)
    • A1:  Delaware Botanic Gardens – From a Humble Beginning to an Amazing Reality by Gregg Tepper. Delaware Botanic Gardens is bringing a new public garden to the Delmarva Peninsula! Join Director of Horticulture, Gregg Tepper as he guides you through the steps that are being taken to create this new coastal plain garden with all the exciting features it will have to delight and inspire you. Attendees will:  be informed of the valuable role Delaware Botanic Gardens will have in inspiring the use of native plants, be inspired to use native plants for their ability to support life as well as their aesthetics, and be informed of the steps needed in creating a public garden.
    • A2:  Plants for 5 Senses by Ian Caton. See your garden, learn your garden, touch your garden, taste your garden, smell your garden. This program will, through a combination of images and demonstrations, present native plants that engage your senses and make your garden an interactive and exciting place to be. Attendees will:  be introduced to new plants, expand their expectations of what makes a good garden, and explore techniques that can be re-created in their own gardens and designs.
    • A3:  Economic Ecology – Floodplain Restoration, Maximizing Economic and Environmental Returns by Kelly Gutshall. Thirty years of observations show how conventional methods of addressing water-resource issues such as, pollutant removal, flood reduction, and habitat restoration in the mid-Atlantic region are frequently land-intensive and cost-prohibitive. Economic Ecology is an innovative, regional approach to solving water issues that can maximize both economic and environmental returns on investment. LandStudies has up to 15 years of monitoring data showing the long-term economic and ecological benefits of such projects. Attendees will:  learn how to maximize economic and environmental returns on investment, learn about cost-benefit analysis, opportunity cost, value proposition, water-quality trading and offsetting, risk-management, and mitigation banking, and learn how to leverage green-infrastructure projects that encourage private and public-private partnerships.
    • A4:  Beyond Honey Bees – Native Bees Need Our Help! by Heather Holm. Contrary to regular reports in the media, honey bees are a globally stable bee species and not at risk of extinction. Native bees, on the other hand, are in serious peril due to the lack of adequate nesting habitat and forage plants. Native bees and native plants share a close co-evolutionary relationship and it is native bees that make the most significant contribution to the pollination of native plants, playing a critical role in improving ecosystem functionality and genetic diversity in native plant communities. Learn about the nesting habitat, life cycle, pollen collection, brood rearing, and habitat requirements of several common genera of native bees. Tools and tips on how to identify bees will also be provided. Attendees will:  learn how to design, plant, and maintain landscapes for bees, explore the diversity and identification of native bees, and learn about threats to native bees.
  • 11:35am – 12:50pm — Lunch (included with conference registration) in Gordonier Hall and Plant Sale/Trade Show OPEN in Marauder Court.
  • 12:50pm-1:50pm — Concurrent Sessions B (4 options)
    • B1:  The New South Garden at Mt. Cuba Center by Eileen Boyle. MCC has just completed the transformation of the South Garden to bring more interest to the Formal Gardens and highlight the use of native plants in a mixed border. Originally designed by Marian Coffin in the 1950s the site has been re-imagined with a nod to her aesthetics. Eileen will talk a little about the history of the site, explain the design process that incorporates a more summer-like progression of bloom. Attendees will:  learn some native plants to use in formal areas, learn the design process for incorporating wild plants in formal gardens, and be able to see the process of color and bloom sequence selection.
    • B2:  Woodland Wonders from the Wild Deuxime Partie by Barry Glick. An enlightening, entertaining and educational look at some of the plants that we overlook on our woodland hikes. Some of the most interesting and unusual wildflowers are growing in our own backyards right under our noses. Join us for a fascinating wild wander into the wonderful world of woodland wildflowers. This is the follow-up to last year’s presentation, but is relevant whether you attended Part One or not. Attendees will:  become familiar with the nomenclature of native plants, be educated in the identification of native plant species, and learn cultural practices and propagation of native plants.
    • B3:  Wilding the Urban Landscapes by John Magee. How to bring native plants into the mainstream urban landscape without upsetting your neighbors. In this presentation John will walk you through a few of his more notable designs from start to finish. Learn how to create habitat for wildlife on your property while beautifying your home through traditional landscaping principles given a modern twist. Stunning before, during and after pictures will bring out the native plant gardener in all of us. Attendees will:  learn how to use native plants in an aesthetically pleasing way, learn how to integrate native plants using traditional landscaping principles, and be able to see before and after images of several projects.
    • B4:  Nature Journaling in the Garden by Carol Welsh and Pat Catucci. Learn how to keep your own nature journal and start a life-long creative habit as you explore native plants in the landscape. Nature Journaling opens a world of beauty and discovery to you as you increase your powers of observation as a naturalist, and improve your writing and artistic skills. With natural specimens at hand, participants will practice both in and outdoors at the conference location. You will learn to use simple innovative thinking practices such as Four Color Analysis and The Nine Investigative Frames to deepen your work and develop new techniques in your journaling style. Wherever you are on your journaling journey, a beginner wanting to know how to take the first step or a seasoned traveler, don’t miss this opportunity to gain new insights and meet up with fellow journalers! Supplies will be available for $10 kit fee or you may bring your own materials. Materials in the Journaling Kit: journal with 140 lb. watercolor paper, pencil, watercolor paints, pencil crayons or markers, fine brushes, black fine point pen. Attendees will:  be introduced to nature journaling practices to increase powers of observation as a naturalist and gardener of native plants, be introduced to 9 investigative frames for journaling, and practice a journaling reflection using 4-Color Analysis.
  • 1:50pm-3:30pm — Poster Session/Demonstrations/Plant Sale and Trade Show OPEN in Marauder Court.
  • 3:30pm-3:45pm — Full Audience:  Woodies of Merit presented by the NPILC Vendors.
  • 3:45pm – 4:45pm — Full Audience:  Designing and Managing Storm Resilient Landscapes by Rebecca McMackin. After Hurricane Sandy in 2012, a Consortium of Coastal Parks was formed by 15 public parks and gardens, with the goal of determining and disseminating best management practices and plant response to flooding. We developed a Best Management Practices document for flooding response and tracked plant response of over 500 species. This presentation will discuss the formation and benefit of the Consortium, the necessity of similar collaborations, and present data results. As we prepare for climate change, these sorts of collaborative research efforts are critical for protecting established landscapes and designing new ones. Attendees will:  learn how to manage a recently flooded landscape, learn what to plant in a coastal landscape, and learn how to prepare for climate change.
  • 4:45pm-6:30pm — Picnic Dinner (included with conference registration) with Outdoor Games on the Lawn by Gordonier.
  • 6:30pm-9:00pm — Entertainment/Social/Plant Sale and Trade Show OPEN and Silent Auction