FRIDAY SCHEDULE

Friday, June 9, 2017

  • 6:30am – 9:00am — Registration in the lobby of the Student Memorial Center (SMC) at Millersville University.
  • 6:30am – 8:00am — Breakfast (included with conference registration) in Gordonier Hall.
  • 7:00am – 8:00am — Plant Sale and Trade Show OPEN in Marauder Court, lower level of SMC.
  • 8:00am – 8:15am — Welcome
  • 8:15am-9:15am – Full Audience:  New Tools to Solve an Old Problem, The Return of the American Chestnut by Bill Powell. The American chestnut is the classic example of our forests succumbing to exotic pathogens. Because of its environmental, economic, and social importance, many tools have been brought to bear on the chestnut blight problem. We have discovered that an oxalate detoxifying enzyme can raise blight resistance levels as high as those found in the blight-resistant Chinese chestnut. Because this is only a very small change in the chestnut, these trees will be ideal for restoration. Attendees will:  understand the importance of the American chestnut tree to the eastern forests of the U.S., learn what can happen to species when exotic pathogens are introduced into an ecosystem, and learn how the tools of genetic engineering can help save a keystone specie and benefit the environment.
    • Approved for the following PA Pesticide credits:  category PC private category – 2 credits, category 05 forest pest control – 2 credits, category 18 demonstration research – 2 credits, category 23 park/school pest control – 2 credits)
    • Approved for 1 LACES credit
    • Approved for 1 APLD credit
  • 9:15am-10:15am – Full Audience:  The Pollination of Native Plants by Heather Holm. Pollination is often believed to be a mutualistic exchange between a pollinator and plant but this is not always the case with the diversity of flower-visiting insects a particular plant may attract. Heather will discuss the factors influencing the effective pollination of native plants including flower development, form, and the presentation of, and types of floral resources offered by a native plant. The presentation will cover the flower-visiting insects, their foraging behavior, and what influences their effectiveness as a pollinator. Attendees will:  learn about plant-pollinator interactions, learn about mutualisms between native bees and native plants, and learn about what makes an effective pollinator.
    • Approved for 1 LACES credit
    • Approved for 1 APLD credit
  • 10:15am-10:35am – Break
  • 10:35am-11:35am – Concurrent Sessions C (4 options)
    • C1.  Native Lilies by Gregg Tepper. Join horticulturist Gregg Tepper for an in-depth look at our native lilies. From growth habit, flowering times and pollinator value to correct culture and site placement, you will learn the intricacies of these astounding plants that command your attention! Attendees will:  be informed of the value of native lilies and their importance within a native garden, be inspired to use native plants for their ability to support life as well as their aesthetics, and be informed about the culture of native lilies.
      • Approved for 1 LACES credit
      • Approved for 1 APLD credit
    • C2. Water in the Landscape by John Magee. Nothing brings life to the garden like adding a water feature whether it is a babbling brook or a still pond; all life is attracted to water. Learn how to avoid easy mistakes and follow along as you’re shown before and after pictures of several projects from start to finish. Attendees will:  learn how to incorporate water into the landscape, learn how to avoid mistakes when installing water features, and view several projects from start to finish.
      • Approved for 1 LACES credit
      • Approved for 1 APLD credit
    • C3. Exploring Grafting for Conservation and Scientific Purposes by Chuck Cannon. Vegetative propagation is occasionally one of the only options for preserving and maintaining germplasm and it is usually the most effective method for production. For trees, this is particularly true, where seeds are often recalcitrant and individuals are slow-growing. At the moment, the majority of woody plant grafting occurs in the nursery trade for production. In the Center for Tree Science, we are pulling together an international group to review and assess the potential for grafting to be used more widely as a conservation tool. Particularly, we want to use modern advanced techniques to move the approach beyond the ‘craft’ stage and to understand the basic aspects of tissue compatibility and self-recognition. Attendees will:  review our knowledge of grafting in woody plants, be introduced to international grafting group, and discuss grafting’s potential for conservation and science.
      • Approved for 1 LACES credit
      • Approved for 1 APLD credit
    • C4. Bringing the Magic of Meadows to School and Communities by Maggie Strucker. The Pocket Meadow Initiative is a program designed by Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve to take a small piece of meadow and recreate it in school yards and public spaces throughout the region. Partnering with school and community groups, season after season of learning, inspiration, and color are cultivated, highlighting the value of native plants. Attendees will learn the challenges of these projects, learn the benefits for participants, and be inspired to pursue pocket meadow habitats in their own area.
      • Approved for 1 LACES credit
      • Approved for 1 APLD credit
  • 11:35am – 12:50pm — Lunch (included with conference registration) in Gordonier Hall and Plant Sale/Trade Show OPEN in Marauder Court.
  • 12:50pm-1:50pm – Concurrent Sessions D (4 options)
    • D1. Encouraging Biodiversity in the Concrete Jungle by Rebecca McMackin. Brooklyn Bridge Park, an 85 acre, organic park in the middle of New York City, was created with ecology in mind. The park’s award winning piers include top notch recreation, from opera to outdoor films, all of it beautifully designed. But the piers also contain native woodlands, freshwater wetlands, salt marshes, and numerous meadows. These areas closely mimic native ecosystems and are managed with an emphasis on wildlife habitat. This talk will detail many of the strategies employed to design an ecological park, as well as the management techniques used to cultivate biodiverse parkland. Attendees will learn how to manage an eco-landscape, learn how to design for wildlife, and learn the history of Brooklyn Bridge Park.
      • Approved for 1 LACES credit
      • Approved for 1 APLD credit
    • D2. Super-tough:  Native Plants for Difficult Situations by Ian Caton. As a Landscape Designer and home gardener I have often had ambitious plans for the creation of amazing diverse gardens with visions of trilliums, phlox, lady slippers and other plants wild and rare. Then reality sets in with the first shovel of hard clay. Then extreme drought, pesky wood goats (deer) and other adversities took over. Eventually I learned how to garden in a way that works with difficult soils, harsh climates and other pests. This lecture is designed as an introduction to wildflowers that have proven, through experience, to be particularly reliable and tough under the most adverse conditions – drought, flooding, extreme heat, hard-pan soils, deer, invasive species invasion, and damage from over-enthusiastic pets, children and spouses. Attendees will understand how plants tolerate harsh conditions, be introduced to new plants and plant combinations, and be introduced to planting techniques and strategies for coping with difficult landscape situations.
      • Approved for 1 LACES credit
      • Approved for 1 APLD credit
    • D3. Roadside Habitat Management Strategies that Promote Native Flora and Their Pollinators by Lisa Kuder. Restoring native meadows along transportation rights-of-way is a key component of national efforts to mitigate pollinator declines. Our multi-year study evaluates two sustainable management strategies, selective herbicide treatments and annual mow, to enhance highway margins for pollinators. Potential contamination of floral resources by common roadside pollutants will also be explored. Preliminary results and implications for conservation efforts will be highlighted. Attendees will learn about sustainable management strategies that promote natural regrowth of native flora and their pollinators, learn about the challenges of ‘rewilding’ roadsides and other habitats and ways to overcome those obstacles, and be provided current status of regional bee fauna and ways the landscape/gardening communities can help.
      • Approved for 1 LACES credit
    • D4. Down and Dirty:  Soil Basics by Eileen Boyle. Soil is not dirt! Healthy soil is alive with micro-organisms and contains the food your plants need. Join Eileen Boyle as she explains why the amazing world beneath your feet is the most essential part of a successful garden and how to improve soil by adding compost from yard waste. We will show you how. Attendees will learn that soil is alive, discover microorganisms living in soil, and understand how to make good compost.
      • Approved for 1 LACES credit
      • Approved for 1 APLD credit
  • 1:50pm-3:30pm — Poster Session/Demonstrations/Plant Sale and Trade Show OPEN in Marauder Court.
  • 3:30pm-3:45pm — Full Audience:  Perennials of Merit presented by the NPILC Vendors.
  • 3:45pm – 4:45pm – Full Audience:  Balancing Culture and Ecology – The Horticultural Passion of Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects by Thomas L. Woltz, FASLA. Thomas will present four recent projects from the firm’s portfolio demonstrating how a thoughtful approach to plant selection can communicate a narrative of a place, perform critical ecological services and use beauty to build strong bonds between people and the land. Attendees will consider how horticultural choices can drive the narrative of a garden or park, learn how plant choice can be used to preform ecological function, and contemplate the importance of beauty in the development of stewardship.
    • Approved for 1 LACES credit
    • Approved for 1 APLD credit
  • 4:00pm-9:00pm – Plant Sale and Trade Show OPEN TO THE PUBLIC in Marauder Court.
  • 4:45pm-6:00pm – Dinner (included with conference registration) in Gordonier Hall.
  • 6:30pm-8:00pm – FREE Screening of Movie “Hometown Habitat” (OPEN TO THE PUBLIC)
  • 9:00pm – whenever — After party at Jack’s Tavern (on your own), 15 S. Prince Street, Millersville PA